Monday, August 24, 2015

The M.Guy Tweet, Week of August 16, 2015

I'm on vacation this week. Check back for the usual bi-weekly update on September 7, 2015. Thanks and enjoy your holiday!

Monday, August 17, 2015

The M.Guy Tweet, Week of August 2, 2015

1. A Millennial Couple Asks: Can We Afford To Have A Baby?, The Washington Post
“We’re just trying to figure out if we’re on the right path,” Saro says. “Based on our financial status, is having a family and growing a possibility, or is it too scary right now?”

2. Americans Are Having The Most Babies In These 20 Cities, Bloomberg Business
The common thread that unites many of these cities is that they have high numbers of young households, according to Mark Mather, associate vice president for domestic programs at the Population Reference Bureau in Washington. 

3. The New Wave Of Millennial Moms Will Be Educated And Married To 'Do-It-All' Dads, Deseret News National
Among 18- to 29-year-olds who are not currently married and have no children, 70 percent say they want to marry and 74 percent say they want to have children.

4. 6 Signs Your Marriage Will Last A Lifetime, MSN
Research shows that couples who do new or different things together--even if it's as simple as a fresh mulching technique--are happier than those who fall into a same-old routine.

5. The Great Teen Sex Decline?, City Journal
What the numbers really say is that with the exception of using more emergency contraception—a.k.a. “the morning-after pill”—teens haven’t changed their sexual habits much since the agency’s last survey in 2002.

6. An Optimal Age To Marry? Age At Marriage And Divorce Risk In Europe And The US, Family Studies
The optimal time to start a lasting first union or marriage is around age 30. 

7. Generation X And Millennials Attitudes Toward Marriage & Divorce, BGSU National Center for Family and Marriage Research
Singles who have cohabited (45%) and cohabitors (49%) are most supportive of divorce.

For more, see here.

Thursday, July 23, 2015

The M.Guy Tweet, Week of July 19, 2015

1. Unmarried Women Now Drive America’s Fertility Trends, And They’re Having Fewer Kids, Wall Street Journal
If you look at the chart above, there’s a kind of tug of war going on between the “married” rate, up top, and the “unmarried” rate, down below. What’s new in recent years is that the unmarried rate now has the greater pull.

2. The College Majors That Are Most Likely To Marry Each Other, Washington Post
Interestingly, the data shows that marrying within your major is more common for people who are an extreme gender minority in their field of study. For example, both male nurses and female engineers are much more likely to find a spouse in their major.

3. In Love—and in Debt, The Atlantic
In one recent survey, 44 percent of Americans said personal finances were the toughest thing to talk about—ahead of religion, politics, and even death.

4. Modern Love Redux: Readers Offer Their Own Honest Thoughts On Marriage, New York Times
That’s probably the best advice I would give — when thinking about choosing a partner, be selfish. Does this person share your values, your likes and dislikes, your ideas on how to live life?

5-7 Goldilocks Theory of Marriage

5. The Goldilocks Theory of Marriage, Slate
Call it the Goldilocks theory of marriage: Getting married too early is risky, but so is getting married too late. Your late 20s and early 30s are just right.

6. People Who Get Married In Mid-30s Or Later At Higher Risk For Divorce, New Study Suggests, People
A new study from University of Utah psychologist Nicholas H. Wolfinger found that those who marry in their mid-30s (or. . . later) are more likely to divorce than people who marry in their late 20s.

7. Math Says This Is The Perfect Age To Get Married, TIME
Still, there are a few truisms backed by research: Having money and a college degree reduces your chances of getting divorced, as does getting engaged before moving in together and waiting to have kids until after the nuptials. Those you can pretty much take to the bank. 

For more from Dr. Wolfinger, see here.  


For more, see here.

Monday, July 13, 2015

The M.Guy Tweet, Week of July 5, 2015

1. Are Women More Likely Than Men To End A Relationship?, ESPN
A review of the literature on divorce that appeared in the journal American Law and Economics Review. . . found that 60 percent to 80 percent of divorces in the U.S. are filed by women.

2. Marriage Remains the Gold Standard, The New York Times
Marriage, by contrast, is marked by a public, dramatic expression of commitment that functions to make each spouse underline their commitment to one another, to foster needed support from friends and family on behalf of the relationship and to recognize their relationship in the eyes of the state.

3. Two Marines, One Deployment And The End Of A Marriage, National Public Radio
I used to have nightmares that someone would knock on the door with a flag. And that's all that I was gonna get back.

4. The Cost Of A Wedding: Colorado Couples Share Their Budgets And Planning Advice, Denver Post
According to The Knot, the average wedding in the U.S. cost $31,213 in 2014.

5. The Surprising Benefits Of Marrying Young, The Art of Manliness
A 2010 study found that couples who married between the ages of 22 and 25 were more likely to describe their marriage as “very happy” than couples who got married in other age brackets.

6. Intact Families, Continued: The Red-County Advantage, The New York Times
“The data suggest that marriage is more likely to ground and guide adult lives, including the entry into parenthood, in red America."

7. A Father’s Struggle to Stop His Daughter’s Adoption, The Atlantic
In the United States, when an unmarried man has a baby, his partner can give it up without his consent—unless he happens to know about an obscure system called the responsible father registry.

For more, see here.

Monday, June 29, 2015

The M.Guy Tweet, Week of June 21, 2015

1. Husbands And Wives: Who Works, Who Doesn't?, National Public Radio
By the turn of the century, the standard had reversed: In nearly two-thirds of. . . marriages, both people worked full time. But in the past 15 years, not much has changed.

2. Men, Women Differ On Morals of Sex, Relationships, Gallup 
Americans are finding more behaviors or social issues "morally acceptable" than they have in the past, but men and women still differ on several issues, notably those related to sex and relationships. 

3. More Than Money: How To Make A Marriage Work When She’s The Primary Breadwinner, The Washington Post
Although a growing share of married mothers earn the majority of income for their families—slightly less than one-quarter of married families with children, according to the American Community Survey, it’s clear that some men in homes with female breadwinners find this new reality hard.

4. Multiracial Marriages Are Dispersing Across The Country, Brookings
To be sure the greatest prevalence of multiracial marriages are in melting-pot states such as Hawaii, where three in 10 marriages are multiracial, as well as Alaska and Oklahoma, where the share is nearly two in 10.

5. The Institution of Marriage: Still Going Strong, National Journal
About two-thirds of younger participants felt that marriage was still relevant and led to a happier, healthier, more fulfilled life. But older participants were much more positive, with three of every four older participants saying that marriage still had an important place in society.

6. How Marriage Makes Men Better Fathers, Family Studies
Living apart from his first child, he continued, “was painful because a father’s love is so often expressed through providing and protecting. And it’s difficult to provide and protect without presence.”

7. 144 Years Of Marriage And Divorce In The United States, In One Chart, The Washington Post
A surge in Baby Boomers in the 1950s and 1960s greatly increased the population; since the Boomers were almost all too young to marry, the per capita marriage rate declined. Once the Boomers got old enough to tie the knot, marriage rates rose back to pre-WWII levels.

For more, see here.

Monday, June 15, 2015

The M.Guy Tweet, Week of June 7, 2015

1. Folkways And Family In America, New York Times
[B]oth “red” and “blue” America offer paths to family stability, with the latter depending more on delayed marriage and childbearing (and, again, somewhat higher abortion rates) and the former more on “deep normative and religious commitments to marriage.”

2. Red State Families: Better Than We Knew, Family Studies
Thus, one reason the bluest states and reddest states deliver more family stability to their adolescents is that they share relatively low levels of nonmarital childbearing.

3. 13 Surprisings Facts About Marriage Today, MSN
Several studies show that most couples wait, on average, just under three years from the time they started dating to get married. And the average engagement? 14 months.

4. Why Remarrying Isn’t What It Used To Be, TIME
In 1990, 50 out of every 1,000 previously-married men and women got married again. In 2013, it was 28, a 40% drop.

5. Marriage Isn't The Only Relationship That's In Trouble For 20-Somethings, Deseret News National
In short, millennials are shaping up not only to be the unmarried generation, but a generation of singles.

6. Regan: Marriage Is Going Out Of Style, And That Could Hurt, USA Today
In 2012, 45% of 18- to 30-year-olds lived with older family members, up from 39% in 1990 and 35% in 1980.

7. Multiracial in America, Pew Research Center
More than 40 years ago, only one of every 100 babies younger than 1 year old and living with two parents was multiracial. By 2013, it was one-in-ten.

For more, see here.

Monday, June 1, 2015

The M.Guy Tweet, Week of May 24, 2015

1. Sex Ed Works Better When It Addresses Power In Relationships, National Public Radio
Knowing how to communicate and negotiate with sexual partners, and knowing how to distinguish between healthy and abusive sexual relationships, are as important as knowing how to put on a condom, DiClemente says.

2. Families Are The Real Issue For Opportunity, Not Inequality, Brookings Institution
A much stronger--indeed one of the strongest--correlate of upward mobility is family structure.

3. Divorce Before vs. After Age 50, Bowling Green State University
59% of of individuals who divorce after age 50 are "Careerists." A divorce careerist is an individual who experienced divorce both prior to and following age 50.

4. The 25 Most Influential Marriages of All Time, TIME
Bill Masters and Virginia Johnson. . . Their groundbreaking numbers-heavy studies of sex made them the punch line of a million jokes, but ultimately contributed to the demystification of one of life’s most miraculous and complex subjects.

5. The Secret Of Happiness Revealed By Harvard Study, Forbes
The 75 year longitudinal Grant Study led by George Vaillant had two main findings: 1) Happiness is love. 2) If alcoholism is not the root of all evil, it is closely correlated with it.

6. What The “Mounting Evidence” On Working Moms Really Shows, Family Studies
[A]s the below figures illustrate, part-time work is the ideal for the majority of married mothers and a substantial minority of single mothers, though working full-time is the most common actual situation for both groups.

7. NY Times: Importance Of Mothers And Fathers An ‘Absurdity’, Breitbart
In its euphoria over the victory of gay marriage in Ireland, the New York Times editers abandoned all pretenses of objectivity and, in an apparently unguarded moment, declared biological motherhood and fatherhood to be absurd.

For more, see here.