Monday, June 29, 2015

The M.Guy Tweet, Week of June 21, 2015

1. Husbands And Wives: Who Works, Who Doesn't?, National Public Radio
By the turn of the century, the standard had reversed: In nearly two-thirds of. . . marriages, both people worked full time. But in the past 15 years, not much has changed.

2. Men, Women Differ On Morals of Sex, Relationships, Gallup 
Americans are finding more behaviors or social issues "morally acceptable" than they have in the past, but men and women still differ on several issues, notably those related to sex and relationships. 

3. More Than Money: How To Make A Marriage Work When She’s The Primary Breadwinner, The Washington Post
Although a growing share of married mothers earn the majority of income for their families—slightly less than one-quarter of married families with children, according to the American Community Survey, it’s clear that some men in homes with female breadwinners find this new reality hard.

4. Multiracial Marriages Are Dispersing Across The Country, Brookings
To be sure the greatest prevalence of multiracial marriages are in melting-pot states such as Hawaii, where three in 10 marriages are multiracial, as well as Alaska and Oklahoma, where the share is nearly two in 10.

5. The Institution of Marriage: Still Going Strong, National Journal
About two-thirds of younger participants felt that marriage was still relevant and led to a happier, healthier, more fulfilled life. But older participants were much more positive, with three of every four older participants saying that marriage still had an important place in society.

6. How Marriage Makes Men Better Fathers, Family Studies
Living apart from his first child, he continued, “was painful because a father’s love is so often expressed through providing and protecting. And it’s difficult to provide and protect without presence.”

7. 144 Years Of Marriage And Divorce In The United States, In One Chart, The Washington Post
A surge in Baby Boomers in the 1950s and 1960s greatly increased the population; since the Boomers were almost all too young to marry, the per capita marriage rate declined. Once the Boomers got old enough to tie the knot, marriage rates rose back to pre-WWII levels.

For more, see here.

Monday, June 15, 2015

The M.Guy Tweet, Week of June 7, 2015

1. Folkways And Family In America, New York Times
[B]oth “red” and “blue” America offer paths to family stability, with the latter depending more on delayed marriage and childbearing (and, again, somewhat higher abortion rates) and the former more on “deep normative and religious commitments to marriage.”

2. Red State Families: Better Than We Knew, Family Studies
Thus, one reason the bluest states and reddest states deliver more family stability to their adolescents is that they share relatively low levels of nonmarital childbearing.

3. 13 Surprisings Facts About Marriage Today, MSN
Several studies show that most couples wait, on average, just under three years from the time they started dating to get married. And the average engagement? 14 months.

4. Why Remarrying Isn’t What It Used To Be, TIME
In 1990, 50 out of every 1,000 previously-married men and women got married again. In 2013, it was 28, a 40% drop.

5. Marriage Isn't The Only Relationship That's In Trouble For 20-Somethings, Deseret News National
In short, millennials are shaping up not only to be the unmarried generation, but a generation of singles.

6. Regan: Marriage Is Going Out Of Style, And That Could Hurt, USA Today
In 2012, 45% of 18- to 30-year-olds lived with older family members, up from 39% in 1990 and 35% in 1980.

7. Multiracial in America, Pew Research Center
More than 40 years ago, only one of every 100 babies younger than 1 year old and living with two parents was multiracial. By 2013, it was one-in-ten.

For more, see here.

Monday, June 1, 2015

The M.Guy Tweet, Week of May 24, 2015

1. Sex Ed Works Better When It Addresses Power In Relationships, National Public Radio
Knowing how to communicate and negotiate with sexual partners, and knowing how to distinguish between healthy and abusive sexual relationships, are as important as knowing how to put on a condom, DiClemente says.

2. Families Are The Real Issue For Opportunity, Not Inequality, Brookings Institution
A much stronger--indeed one of the strongest--correlate of upward mobility is family structure.

3. Divorce Before vs. After Age 50, Bowling Green State University
59% of of individuals who divorce after age 50 are "Careerists." A divorce careerist is an individual who experienced divorce both prior to and following age 50.

4. The 25 Most Influential Marriages of All Time, TIME
Bill Masters and Virginia Johnson. . . Their groundbreaking numbers-heavy studies of sex made them the punch line of a million jokes, but ultimately contributed to the demystification of one of life’s most miraculous and complex subjects.

5. The Secret Of Happiness Revealed By Harvard Study, Forbes
The 75 year longitudinal Grant Study led by George Vaillant had two main findings: 1) Happiness is love. 2) If alcoholism is not the root of all evil, it is closely correlated with it.

6. What The “Mounting Evidence” On Working Moms Really Shows, Family Studies
[A]s the below figures illustrate, part-time work is the ideal for the majority of married mothers and a substantial minority of single mothers, though working full-time is the most common actual situation for both groups.

7. NY Times: Importance Of Mothers And Fathers An ‘Absurdity’, Breitbart
In its euphoria over the victory of gay marriage in Ireland, the New York Times editers abandoned all pretenses of objectivity and, in an apparently unguarded moment, declared biological motherhood and fatherhood to be absurd.

For more, see here.

Monday, May 18, 2015

The M.Guy Tweet, May 10, 2015

1. The Bad News (Poverty) And Good News (Education) About Millennial Parent, The Wall Street Journal
Since 2009, the share of impoverished young people has been higher than at any other point in the past 25 years.

2. Fewer Educated Women Are Choosing To Skip Having Kids, PBS
However, childlessness among women between the ages of 40 and 44, regardless of education, is “at the lowest point in a decade,” the study says.

3. Census Bureau Decides To Keep Marriage Questions On Survey, Pew Research Center
Under pressure from academics and advocates, the U.S. Census Bureau has abandoned plans to delete a series of questions about marriage and divorce from its largest household survey.

4. Why Millennials Might Be Having Less Sex Than Their Parents, TIME
Even more shocking? The study says one in three 20-somethings have never had sex at all.

5. How Your Hometown Affects Your Chances of Marriage, New York Times
Spending childhood nearly anywhere in blue America — especially liberal bastions like New York, San Francisco, Chicago, Boston and Washington — makes people about 10 percentage points less likely to marry relative to the rest of the country.

6. Shared Finances Can Be A Thorny Issue If You’re Not Married, The Washington Post
[C]ouples acting under the influence of a romantic high can establish financial bonds before “they’ve developed a mutual and clear dedication to a future with each other,” Stanley said. “They are giving up options before making a choice.”

7. Improving Opportunity For Black Men: The Role Of Economics, Culture, And Policy [VIDEO], American Enterprise Institute
How can public policy and cultural attitudes help improve the prospects of black men, and what role do economic factors play?

For more, see here.

Monday, April 27, 2015

The M.Guy Tweet, Week of April 19, 2015

1. They Do: The Scholarly About-Face on Marriage, The Boston Globe
Recently, however, a wave of research from think tanks on the right and left, as well as scholars in social sciences like economics and sociology, has made a forceful new defense of the venerable institution.

2. Love at First Sight Is Real, If You Believe, Wall Street Journal
Romantic love’s intense desire for connection with the other person typically lasts 18 months to three years, experts say. Its evolutionary purpose is to help people pick one partner and bond in order to raise a child.

3. What I Learned About Love During My Years of Reporting on Weddings, The Washington Post
For 10 minutes each day, couples should “talk about something other than work, family, who does what around the house or your relationship.” . . . Anything that allows you to stop and connect and not just feel like business partners trying to make your way through a packed agenda.

4. Marriage Rates Keep Falling, as Money Concerns Rise, The New York Times
Though marriage was once a steppingstone to economic stability, young adults now see financial stability as a prerequisite for marriage. More than a quarter of those who say they want to marry someday say they haven’t yet because they are not financially prepared, according to Pew.

5. What Divorce Does to Women’s Heart Health, TIME
Women who divorced at least once were 24% more likely to experience a heart attack compared to women who remained married, and those divorcing two or more times saw their risk jump to 77%.

6. Sex, Race, Education and the Marriage Gap, Newsweek
There is a growing “marriage gap” in the United States. Marriage rates among the non-college-educated population have fallen sharply in the last few decades, and sharpest of all in the black population.

7. The Scientific Way Divorce Breaks Your Heart, Deseret News
"Marriage counseling is focused largely on younger couples. . . But these results show that marital quality is just as important at older ages, even when the couple has been married 40 to 50 years."

For more, see here.

Tuesday, April 14, 2015

The M.Guy Tweet, Week of April 5, 2015

1. Sex Education in Europe Turns to Urging More Births, New York Times
Christine Antorini, the Danish education minister, said in a statement that the government was now seeking “a stronger focus on a broad and positive approach to health and sexuality, where sexual health covers both joys and risks associated with sexual behavior.”

2. A Classic Prep For Parenthood, But Is The Egg All It's Cracked Up To Be?, National Public Radio
"It's just one of those assignments that really sticks with them. They remember how hard it is and the amount of care and responsibility involved."

3. The Sexually Conservative Millennial, The Atlantic
A majority of young people consider random sex morally wrong in some circumstances, and many of them consider it always wrong. So much for hookup culture.

4. More U.S. Women Are Going Childless, Wall Street Journal
Some Americans may now prefer life without children, though most still report in surveys that they want two kids. Others may be struggling to have children, or can’t afford expensive fertility treatments.

5. How to Avoid a Post-Wedding Letdown, New York Times
“If the couple’s primary focus is on the wedding day itself rather than the marriage, then a crash is inevitable,” Dr. Charnas said. “However, if the emotional investment can be shifted from the wedding to the marriage and the couple’s partnership, then the perspective changes and the wedding is cast in a new light.”

6. The 8 Most Common Reasons for Divorce, MSN
Seventy-three percent of couples said a lack of commitment was the main reason their marriage didn’t work. . . Thirty-five percent of men and 21 percent of women said they wished they, themselves, had worked harder in the marriage.

7. Don’t Be a Bachelor: Why Married Men Work Harder, Smarter and Make More Money, The Washington Post
Marriage has a transformative effect on adult behavior, emotional health, and financial well-being—particularly for men.  (Parenthood is more transformative for women.)

[Note: And if parenthood is notably transformative for women, we women should note that the optimal environment in which to raise our child, according to the research, is marriage. Marriage matters for us too.]

For more, see here

Monday, March 30, 2015

The M.Guy Tweet, Week of March 22, 2015

1. Minding the Nurture Gap, The Economist
The most important divide in America today is class, not race, and the place where it matters most is in the home. Conservatives have been banging on about family breakdown for decades. Now one of the nation’s most prominent liberal scholars has joined the chorus.

2. A Mission to Save Marriages, The Guardian
Nicky and Sila Lee help couples to stay together by running marriage courses. There's no counselling, no airing of dirty linen in public, no group therapy – and it seems to work.

3. For Richer or Poorer: The Challenges of Marrying Outside Your Class, The Washington Post
Though it shaped these couples’ lives, most people I spoke with swore they never thought about the class differences in their relationships, afraid that doing so made them, in the words of one source, “snotty.”

4. To Help Couples Get Married, Focus on Something Else, Family Studies
All of these examples suggest that change sometimes happens through indirection: in order to encourage a behavior, focus less on the desired behavior and more on the things that put a person on the path to that behavior.

5. Life Events That Can Lead to Divorce, ABC News
“If you stop prioritizing your marriage and allow it to play second fiddle to work, your partner will probably start to feel isolated and angry,” says Ochoa.

6. eHarmony Founder Talks Matchmaking in the Age of Tinder, The Wall Street Journal
I think under CEO Greg Waldorf, users started seeing us more like the other dating sites Match and Zoosk, when we’re really a social science site. We were never meant to be a dating site. We were meant to be a matchmaking site. 

7. Substance Abuse, Mental Illness, and Crime More Common in Disrupted Families, Family Studies
In the 2011-2012 National Survey of Children’s Health, 21 percent of children cared for by a divorced or separated mother had lived with someone—usually a parent or sibling—who “had a problem with alcohol or drugs.” This was five times higher than the rate for children cared for by married birth parents.

For more, see here.